Of the roughly 50,000 trekkers who start their ascent on the arresting giant annually, about 70% make have the pleasure of entering their name in the small diary preserved in a wooden box as a mark of their successful ascent. But over the years, since German geographer Hans Meyer and Austrian mountain climber Ludwig Purtscheller climbed the mountain for the first time in 1889 many have followed suit. But there always stories that stand out in the annals of history.

Throwing caution to the wind, Swiss veteran mountain guide, Karl Egloff, dashed off to the top of Kilimanjaro and down in just 6 hours, 42 minutes and 24 seconds. And in the process wiped off Spanish mountain runner, Kilian Jornet’s record of scaling the mountain in 7 hours, 14 minutes, managed in 2010. But lesser mortal would do well to summiting at the end of a week-long trek.

If that didn’t blow your mind then take this; Keats Boyd aged just 7 managed the feat in January 2008, and in doing so set the course for Cash Callahan, and Coaltan Tanner. Cash improved on the timings a decade later and on  22 October 2018,  Coaltan Tanner, from Albuquerque, New Mexico, raised the bar even higher by reaching the summit of Kilimanjaro unaided aged just 6.

Not to be left behind, senior citizens also did their bit to add a few glowing chapters to the successful ascent stories. Dr. Fred Distelhorst, a retired orthodontist from Vail, Colorado climbed Kilimanjaro on July 20th, 2017 aged 88. She merely bettered Russian octagenarian Angela Vorobeva’s feat who managed to summit at 86. There’s also South African Bernard Goosen, born with cerebral palsy who scaled Mt. Kilimanjaro twice in a wheelchair.